Category Archives: chemistry

New driving force for chemical reactions discovered

From PhysOrg.com:

New research just published in the journal Science by a team of chemists at the University of Georgia and colleagues in Germany shows for the first time that a mechanism called tunneling control may drive chemical reactions in directions unexpected from traditional theories.

The finding has the potential to change how scientists understand and devise reactions in everything from materials science to biochemistry.

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Filed under chemistry, quantum mechanics

New ‘nanobead’ approach could revolutionize sensor technology

From PhysOrg.com:

Researchers at Oregon State University have found a way to use magnetic “nanobeads” to help detect chemical and biological agents, with possible applications in everything from bioterrorism to medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring or even water and food safety.

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Filed under chemical measurement, chemistry, nanotechnology

New carbon allotrope could have a variety of applications

From PhysOrg.com:

Carbon comes in many different forms, and now scientists have predicted another new form, or allotrope, of carbon. The new form of carbon, which they call T-carbon, has very intriguing physical properties that suggest that it could have a wide variety of applications.

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A chance discovery may revolutionize hydrogen production

From EurekAlert:

Producing hydrogen in a sustainable way is a challenge and production cost is too high. A team led by EPFL Professor Xile Hu has discovered that a molybdenum based catalyst is produced at room temperature, inexpensive and efficient. The results of the research are published online in Chemical Science Thursday the 14th of April. An international patent based on this discovery has just been filed

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Molecular fridge can reach millikelvin

From Chemistry World:

Scientists have laid the foundations for a high-performance ‘molecular fridge’ capable of reaching temperatures within a few thousandths of a degree of absolute zero (0K) with a high degree of efficiency. Such ultracoolers could have applications in areas such as ultra-low temperature physics, where alternative technologies such as those that rely on expensive and rare helium-3 could be unsuitable or too costly.

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Search for Advanced Materials Aided by Discovery of Hidden Symmetries in Nature

From ScienceDaily:

A new way of understanding the structure of proteins, polymers, minerals, and engineered materials will be published in the May 2011 issue of the journal Nature Materials. The discovery by two Penn State University researchers is a new type of symmetry in the structure of materials, which the researchers say greatly expands the possibilities for discovering or designing materials with desired properties.

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Filed under biotechnology, molecular biology, organic chemistry

Researchers Close in on Technology for Making Renewable Petroleum

From Science Daily:

University of Minnesota researchers are a key step closer to making renewable petroleum fuels using bacteria, sunlight and carbon dioxide.

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Note: The article falsely states that “CO2 is the major greenhouse gas mediating global climate change”. The facts are that water vapor is the greenhouse gas with the most important effect on temperature, based on its per-molecule potency and its relative abundance in the atmosphere (click on link attached to water vapor for references,) and that the hypothesis that human emissions of carbon dioxide are responsible for climate change not only has not been proven, it has in fact been falsified.

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Filed under energy technology, organic chemistry