Category Archives: quantum mechanics

Canadian researchers devise method to directly measure the quantum wavefunction

From PhysOrg.com:

To get around that problem, the team, led by Jeff Lundeen, devised a method based on “weak” measurements, whereby an observation is made that only alters the particle just a little tiny bit and gives information about just one property of the particle at a time. Taking multiple such measurements of identical copies of a particle, such as a photon, gives more and more information, eventually approaching a very close approximation to the actual state of the system. In one respect this approach is similar to the way calculus is used to measure irregularly shaped objects by cutting it into a number that approaches infinity, virtual slices, then adding up the results. When combined with more certain “strong” measurement results, the procedure provides an accurate measurement of the wavefunction.

Continued

Leave a comment

Filed under quantum measurement, quantum mechanics

New driving force for chemical reactions discovered

From PhysOrg.com:

New research just published in the journal Science by a team of chemists at the University of Georgia and colleagues in Germany shows for the first time that a mechanism called tunneling control may drive chemical reactions in directions unexpected from traditional theories.

The finding has the potential to change how scientists understand and devise reactions in everything from materials science to biochemistry.

Continued

Leave a comment

Filed under chemistry, quantum mechanics

Moving mirrors make light from nothing

From NatureNews:

A team of physicists is claiming to have coaxed sparks from the vacuum of empty space. If verified, the finding would be one of the most unusual experimental proofs of quantum mechanics in recent years and “a significant milestone”, says John Pendry, a theoretical physicist at Imperial College London who was not involved in the study.

Continued

Leave a comment

Filed under quantum mechanics, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs)

“Proton dripping” tests a fundamental force in nature

From PhysOrg.com:

Like gravity, the strong interaction is a fundamental force of nature. It is the essential “glue” that holds atomic nuclei—composed of protons and neutrons— together to form atoms, the building blocks of nearly all the visible matter in the universe. Despite its prevalence in nature, researchers are still searching for the precise laws that govern the strong force. However, the recent discovery of an extremely exotic, short-lived nucleus called fluorine-14 in laboratory experiments may indicate that scientists are gaining a better grasp of these rules.

Continued

Leave a comment

Filed under physical modelling, strong force

Quantum simulation with light: Frustrations between photon pairs

From PhysOrg.com:

Researchers of the University of Vienna used a quantum mechanical system in the laboratory to simulate complex many-body systems. This experiment promises future quantum simulators enormous potential insights into unknown quantum phenomena.

Continued

Leave a comment

Filed under quantum computation, quantum mechanics

Single atom stores quantum information

From PhysOrg.com:

A data memory can hardly be any smaller: researchers working with Gerhard Rempe at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching have stored quantum information in a single atom. The researchers wrote the quantum state of single photons, i.e. particles of light, into a rubidium atom and read it out again after a certain storage time. This technique can be used in principle to design powerful quantum computers and to network them with each other across large distances.

Continued

Leave a comment

Filed under memory technology, nanotechnology, quantum communications, quantum measurement, quantum mechanics

Proposed gamma-ray laser could emit ‘nuclear light’

From PhysOrg.com:

Building a nuclear gamma-ray laser has been a challenge for scientists for a long time, but a new proposal for such a device has overcome some of the most difficult problems. In the new study, Eugene Tkalya from the Institute of Nuclear Physics at Moscow State University has theoretically proven how the stimulated gamma emission of thorium nuclei can emit coherent visible light. Although the nuclear gamma-ray laser emits light based on stimulated emission, it operates a bit differently than a normal laser.

Continued

Leave a comment

Filed under lasers, quantum measurement, quantum mechanics