Category Archives: electromagnetic technology

Molybdenite outshines silicon and graphene for electronic applications

From Gizmag:

Researchers have uncovered a material that they say has distinct advantages over traditional silicon and even graphene for use in electronics. Called molybdenite (MoS2), this mineral is abundant in nature and is commonly used as an element in steel alloys or, thanks to its similarity in appearance and feel to graphite, as an additive in lubricant. But the mineral hadn’t been studied for use in electronics, which appears to have been an oversight with new research showing that molybdenite is a very effective semiconductor that could enable smaller and more energy efficient transistors, computer chips and solar cells.

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Filed under integrated circuits, transistors

Vertical cavity quantum switch could lead us away from electronics-based computing

From PhysOrg.com:

Right now, many researchers around the world are working on ways to move away from electronics-dominated computing systems. There are a number of ideas about how this can be accomplished. “We are trying to demonstrate an all-optical switch that, at the first stage, could be used in ultrafast optical communication systems,” Chaoyuan Jin tells PhysOrg.com. “It might also be useful for optical interconnection to replace present day electronic links which transfer tremendous data between computer chips, or perhaps useful for optical computing on-chip.”

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Why ‘event cloaks’ could be the key to the ultimate bank heist

From PhysOrg.com:

In this month’s special issue of Physics World, which examines the science and applications of invisibility, Martin McCall and Paul Kinsler of Imperial College London describe a new type of invisibility cloak that does not just hide objects – but events.

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Filed under optical technology

Chameleon magnets: ability to switch magnets ‘on’ or ‘off’ could revolutionize computing

From PhysOrg.com:

In their Science commentary, Zutic and Cerne write that chameleon magnets could “help us make more versatile transistors and bring us closer to the seamless integration of memory and logic by providing smart hardware that can be dynamically reprogrammed for optimal performance of a specific task.”

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Toward faster transistors: New physical phenomenon could lead to increases in computers’ clock speed

From PhysOrg.com:

In this week’s issue of the journal Science, MIT researchers and their colleagues at the University of Augsburg in Germany report the discovery of a new physical phenomenon that could yield transistors with greatly enhanced capacitance — a measure of the voltage required to move a charge. And that, in turn, could lead to the revival of clock speed as the measure of a computer’s power.

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Single molecule electronics and ‘chemical soldering’

From PhysOrg.com:

Single molecule electronics is a division of nanotechnology utilizing single molecules as electronic components and its study has the ultimate goal of reducing the size of common electrical circuits. Since 1974, when Mark Ratner and Arieh Aviram from IBM first described how a single molecule was capable of working as a diode in passing current in one direction, research has moved forward in trying to develop a way to use single molecule electronics.

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Millimeter-wave photonic wireless links for very high data rate communication

From NatureAsia.com:

In this paper, recent progress in millimeter-wave (MMW) photonic gigabit wireless communication is reviewed. This technique is attractive partly because the MMW signal can be easily distributed from central to base stations through the use of a low-loss optical fiber. This radio-over-fiber approach facilitates the transmission of MMW signals. An MMW photonic transmitter, comprised of high-power photodiodes with integrated antennas for MMW signal broadcasting, is needed for signal generation only over the last mile. The development of several different low-noise optical MMW sources and high-power photonic transmitters and photodiodes for optical MMW wireless links is summarized. The performance of photonic wireless links with extremely high data rates (>10 Gbit s–1) developed based on these key components and using different modulation schemes is also reviewed. Finally, some advanced commercially available products and the prospects of a future gigabit wireless communication era are discussed.

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Filed under communications technology, photonics